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How many hours do English teachers in South Korea work?

Introduction

English teaching is a popular profession in South Korea, with many foreigners coming to the country to teach. However, one question that often comes up is how many hours do English teachers work in South Korea? In this article, we’ll explore the answer to that question and provide a comprehensive look at the working hours of English teachers in South Korea.

The Basic Workweek

The basic workweek for English teachers in South Korea is 22 hours per week. This is the minimum requirement set by the Korean government for foreign English teachers working in public schools. However, many private language schools (hagwons) require their teachers to work more than 22 hours per week.

Contractual Obligations

In addition to the basic workweek, most English teachers in South Korea have contractual obligations that require them to work more than 22 hours per week. These obligations can include preparation time, office hours, and extracurricular activities.

Preparation Time

Preparation time is an essential part of an English teacher’s job. It involves planning lessons, grading papers, and preparing materials for class. Most contracts require English teachers to spend a certain amount of time each week on preparation.

Office Hours

Office hours refer to the time that teachers must spend in school outside of class time. During this time, teachers are expected to be available to students for questions or help with assignments. The number of office hours required varies by school and contract.

Extracurricular Activities

Extracurricular activities can include anything from after-school tutoring sessions to organizing school events. While not all contracts require English teachers to participate in extracurricular activities, some schools may offer additional pay or benefits for those who do.

Overtime Pay

If an English teacher in South Korea works more than their contracted hours, they are entitled to overtime pay. The rate of overtime pay varies by contract, but it is typically 1.5 times the regular hourly rate.

Working on Saturdays

Some contracts require English teachers to work on Saturdays. This can be in the form of teaching classes or participating in school events. However, most contracts offer additional pay or a day off during the week in exchange for working on Saturdays.

Summer and Winter Vacation

Most contracts for English teachers in South Korea include summer and winter vacation periods. During these periods, teachers are not required to work and can use the time to travel or pursue other interests.

Sick Days

English teachers in South Korea are entitled to sick days, which vary by contract. Some contracts offer paid sick days, while others require teachers to use their vacation time if they are unable to work due to illness.

Public Holidays

English teachers in South Korea are entitled to public holidays, which include both Korean holidays and international holidays such as Christmas and New Year’s Day. However, if a public holiday falls on a Saturday or Sunday, it may not be observed.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the number of hours that English teachers work in South Korea varies depending on their contract and school. While the basic workweek is 22 hours per week, many English teachers work more than this due to contractual obligations such as preparation time, office hours, and extracurricular activities. However, English teachers in South Korea are entitled to overtime pay for any hours worked beyond their contracted hours.

How many hours do teachers work in South Korea?

The amount of time you work per week varies based on the type of job you have. Typically, public school positions through EPIK require up to 22 teaching hours each week, while positions at Hagwons often require 30 teaching hours per week. This information is accurate as of January 12th, 2023.

Do English teachers get paid well in Korea?

Newcomer English instructors in South Korea who work in public schools via schemes like EPIK usually earn a monthly salary ranging from 1.5 to 3 million won ($1,850 – $2,650 USD). Meanwhile, English teachers in private schools (Hagwons) receive monthly remuneration from 1.9 to 2.4 million won ($1,600 – $2,000 USD). This information was last updated on January 13, 2023.

How long are English teaching contracts in Korea?

All contracts for teaching English as a second language jobs in Korea are for a duration of one year.

What country has the shortest school day?

In Finland, the school day usually begins between 9 and 9:45 a.m., and students typically spend around five hours in the classroom each day. This is a common schedule in the country.

How much money can you save teaching English in Korea?

Teaching English in Korea can help you save up to $16,000 annually because of the country’s low cost of living and free housing provided by your employer. It’s possible to save $1000 per month from your salary.

Do English teachers in Korea get free housing?

Teaching in Korea comes with the benefit of free accommodations as schools cover the cost of housing. You will either be provided with a rent-free apartment or receive a monthly housing allowance, in addition to your salary, to cover your rent expenses.

It’s important to note that the workload of English teachers in South Korea can be demanding, especially for those who work at private language schools. These schools may require teachers to work longer hours and have higher expectations for their performance. However, many teachers find the experience to be rewarding, as they have the opportunity to immerse themselves in a new culture while teaching students from diverse backgrounds.

Another factor to consider when it comes to working hours for English teachers in South Korea is the location of their school. Teachers who are based in urban areas may have longer commutes and more traffic to contend with, which can add to their workload. On the other hand, teachers who are based in rural areas may have fewer resources available to them, such as access to public transportation or a variety of recreational activities.

Despite these challenges, many English teachers in South Korea choose to stay for multiple years or even make it their long-term career. They find that the experience of teaching abroad not only enhances their professional skills but also their personal growth and development. Additionally, many schools offer benefits such as housing allowances and health insurance, which can make the experience more financially feasible.

In conclusion, while the number of hours that English teachers work in South Korea can vary, it’s important to consider contractual obligations such as preparation time, office hours, and extracurricular activities. It’s also important to take into account other factors such as location and workload demands. Despite these challenges, many English teachers find the experience of teaching in South Korea to be rewarding and enriching both professionally and personally.

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